About Me

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Measuring light levels in Delaware Estuary (June 2010)

I grew up in Southern California and spent my early years adventuring in the Mohave Desert and playing in the waves of Zuma Beach.

I began my scientific career at Loyola Marymount University, working as an undergraduate researcher in organic chemistry with Dr. Jeremy McCallum. There I studied Guanine-quadraplex formations, developing various syntheses and modeling molecular structures.

I spent the summer of 2010 at Rutgers University for the Research in Ocean Sciences (RIOS) REU program. Working with John Wilkin, I developed a project looking at the connections between sediment, optics, and productivity in the Delaware estuary.  After just 10 weeks of working on this project, I found myself hooked on physical oceanography and knew I wanted to study it further.

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Some residual dye on my face after a dye injection in the Chukchi Sea.. oops!  (September 2014)

In 2016 I earned my PhD in physical oceanography from Rutgers University under the advisement of  Bob Chant and John Wilkin.  With the support of  an NSF graduate research fellowship, I studied sediment dynamics in the Delaware Estuary.  I used both observations and a numerical model to analyze how lateral processes facilitate along-estuary sediment transport and contribute to heterogeneity in the distribution of estuarine sediment.

After graduation, I headed back west for a short a postdoc at Scripps Institute of Oceanography working with Sarah Giddings and Falk Feddersen.  There, I worked on the development of a numerical model of the Tijuana river estuary and southern California inner-shelf to look at connectivity between the estuary and nearshore.

In September 2017, I began a ONR-funded postdoc at Oregon State University with Jim Lerczak and Jack Barth studying the shoreward propagation of non-linear internal waves (NLIWs) on the inner-shelf of central California.  In this project, we use data from shipboard surveys and a mooring array offshore of central California to evaluate how NLIWs evolve during shoaling and influence shelf stratification.